State-of-the-Science and the Future of Cumulative Impact Assessment

Cumulative exposures, health risks, and other impacts experienced in diverse populations

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine seek suggestions for subject matter experts and community liaisons to participate in a new study on cumulative impact assessment, “State-of-the-Science and the Future of Cumulative Impact Assessment.” Further, the new study will address the need to understand better and manage cumulative exposures, health risks, and other impacts experienced in diverse populations. National Academies staff are forming a committee of approximately 15 volunteer experts in risk assessment, public health, community-engaged participatory research, and sociology. For more information about the call for experts and community liaisons on the new study “State-of-the-Science and the Future of Cumulative Impact Assessment,” please visit the link below. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsors the new study; the deadline is at the end of this week on Friday, February 16, 2024.

“Using an interdisciplinary approach, this work will explore the state-of-the-science of cumulative impact assessment and its application at the community, state, and national levels. The work will entail public workshops, community and tribal engagement, and a broad array of consulted scientific expertise. It will build from prior National Academies reports highlighting the need to better characterize and manage cumulative exposures, health risks, and other impacts experienced in diverse populations. Overall, the aim is to highlight key opportunities and challenges to advancing the science and practice of cumulative impact assessment in an integrated social-environmental framework.”

(Source: www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/state-of-the-science-and-the-future-of-cumulative-impact-assessment)

© 2024 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables owner-operators, investors, governments, engineers, and other decision-makers to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2024 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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ClimaTwin Participates in Climate Conversations: COP28 by the National Academies

ClimaTwin is proud to participate in the Climate Conversations: COP28, hosted by the National Academies. The event features a discussion about the outcomes of the 28th UN Conference of the Parties (COP28) and the implications for the future of global climate policy. Sara Schonhardt (E&E News) moderates a discussion between Lama Elhatow (Johns Hopkins University) and Nathan Hultman (University of Maryland) to address conference outcomes, final agreements, and climate actions. About the National Academies: “Throughout any given year, the National Academies convene hundreds of conferences, workshops, symposia, forums, roundtables, and other gatherings that attract the finest minds in academia and the public and private sectors.”

“Sara Schonhardt is a reporter at E&E News. Sara covers climate and energy developments globally, with a focus on international climate negotiations, finance and how countries are approaching the transition to cleaner economies. Prior to joining E&E News, Sara worked as a reporter for more than a decade across much of Southeast Asia, with stints for The New York Times, Christian Science Monitor and Voice of America. She was a staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal in Indonesia until 2017. Sara has a degree in journalism from Ohio University and a master’s degree in international affairs from Columbia University.”

“Lama Elhatow is currently a Professor and Program Coordinator at Johns Hopkins University for the Environmental Science and Policy and Energy, Policy and Climate programs. Lama is also an Environmental and Social Specialist at the International Finance Corporation (IFC) focusing on projects in sectors including manufacturing, infrastructure services, and financial markets. Lama engaged in the UNFCCC climate change negotiations with Climate Action Network-International as a Climate Policy Officer from 2009-2014, and again in 2022, working with governments in the Arab region to reduce their GHG emissions whilst following both the mitigation and adaptation tracks. Lama is a passionate environmentalist and an avid learner of the complexities of our ecosystem and is often amazed at the interconnectedness of everything within it.”

“Nathan Hultman is the founder and director of the Center for Global Sustainability at the University of Maryland, and professor in the School of Public Policy. His work focuses on setting and achieving ambitious national climate goals. He was recently senior advisor to the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate at the U.S. Department of State, and served for two years in the Obama White House including for the Paris climate negotiations. While in government, he helped develop the U.S. 2025 NDC, led the writing for the 2021 U.S. Long-Term Strategy under the Paris Agreement, and helped negotiate the U.S.-China Glasgow Declaration. He has participated in the U.N. climate process for over 25 years, starting with COP3 Kyoto, and has attended 21 COPs.”

© 2024 The National Academies. All rights reserved.

(Source: www.nationalacademies.org/event/41711_01-2024_climate-conversations-cop28)

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables owner-operators, investors, governments, engineers, and other decision-makers to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2024 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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National Academies on Macroeconomics and Climate-related Risks & Opportunities

Climate and macroeconomy crucial for risk assessments and long-term planning

On November 1st and 2nd, 2023, the National Academies’ Roundtable on Macroeconomics and Climate-related Risks and Opportunities presents a two-day workshop entitled “Macroeconomics and Climate-related Risks and Opportunities: The Dynamics of Climate and the Macroeconomy.” Further, the workshop examines the state of understanding of cascading, compounding, and nonlinear physical climate risks and respective implications for the macroeconomy. “Understanding how climate impacts and the macroeconomy interact is crucial for informed policy, risk assessments, and long-term planning.” The first day of the workshop focuses on physical climate risks and how different disciplines assess and model impacts. And, the second day of the workshop explores examples and lessons learned, culminating in interactive breakout sessions “…to identify the needs and priorities necessary for an agenda to advance research on systematic risk assessment.”

About the Roundtable

The National Academies’ Roundtable on Macroeconomics and Climate-related Risks and Opportunities is a new venue for federal agencies and cross-disciplinary experts in academia, industry, and non-governmental organizations to discuss challenges associated with integrating climate change and climate policy into macroeconomic analyses and projections. The Roundtable is comprised of volunteer experts in fields including economics, earth and life sciences, public policy, engineering, and sociology, and also welcomes several members in an ex officio capacity, including from the White House Council of Economic Advisors and the Office of Management and Budget. This effort aims to develop a scholarly and analytic foundation that can inform policy with macroeconomic analyses that incorporate a full, nuanced, and rigorous understanding of the potential impacts of climate change and climate-related transitions. Visit the project page to sign up for email updates about our work.

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences, All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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Climate and macroeconomy crucial for risk assessments and long-term planning

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The Science of Extreme Weather Attribution in the Context of Climate Change

“As the climate has warmed over recent years, a new pattern of more frequent and more intense weather events has unfolded across the globe. Climate models simulate such changes in extreme events, and some of the reasons for the changes are well understood. Warming increases the likelihood of extremely hot days and nights, favors increased atmospheric moisture that may result in more frequent heavy rainfall and snowfall and leads to evaporation that can exacerbate droughts.

Even with evidence of these broad trends, scientists cautioned in the past that individual weather events couldn’t be attributed to climate change. Now, with advances in understanding the climate science behind extreme events and the science of extreme event attribution, such blanket statements may not be accurate. The relatively young science of extreme event attribution seeks to tease out the influence of human-caused climate change from other factors, such as natural sources of variability like El Niño, as contributors to individual extreme events.

Event attribution can answer questions about how much climate change influenced the probability or intensity of a specific type of weather event. As event attribution capabilities improve, they could help inform choices about assessing and managing risk, and in guiding climate adaptation strategies. This report examines the current state of the science of extreme weather attribution and identifies ways to move the science forward to improve attribution capabilities.”

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Division on Earth and Life StudiesBoard on Atmospheric Sciences and ClimateCommittee on Extreme Weather Events and Climate Change Attribution

This study was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation under contract number 2015-63077, the Heising-Simons Foundation under contract number 2015-095, the Litterman Family Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under contract number NNX15AW55G, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration under contract number EE-133E-15-SE-1748, and the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-SC0014256, with additional support from the National Academy of Sciences’ Arthur L. Day Fund. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-38094-2
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-38094-4
Library of Congress Control Number: 2016946880
Digital Object Identifier: 10.17226/21852

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21852.)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All Rights Reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp.

ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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