How Climate Change Impacts Precipitation Patterns and the Built Environment

How Climate Change Impacts Precipitation Patterns and the Built Environment

 

The impact of precipitation due to climate change on infrastructure is significant and far-reaching. As the climate continues to change, extreme weather events such as heavy rainfall and flooding are becoming more frequent and intense, putting infrastructure at risk of damage and deterioration.

One of the most significant impacts of increased precipitation on infrastructure is the increased risk of flooding. Urban infrastructure such as roads, bridges, and buildings are not designed to withstand the levels of rainfall that can occur during extreme weather events, leading to damage and in some cases, destruction. This poses a risk to public safety and results in substantial economic costs for repairs and rebuilding.

In addition, increased precipitation can lead to the erosion of soil and degradation of land, which can affect the stability of infrastructure such as railway lines, pipelines, and power transmission lines. This can result in disruptions to services and transportation and increased maintenance costs.

Furthermore, higher precipitation levels can also lead to the deterioration of infrastructure materials such as concrete and steel, leading to increased maintenance and replacement costs.

In conclusion, the impact of precipitation due to climate change on infrastructure is a significant challenge that must be addressed through proactive planning, investment in resilient infrastructure, and effective management of water resources. Failure to do so will lead to further risks to public safety and economic stability.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables owner-operators, investors, governments, engineers, and other decision-makers to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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The 2nd Annual Ramanathan Climate Conversation on Floods in Asia

Impacts of climate change on flooding from rain, rivers, and seas, and approaches to mitigate damage

The National Academies, Division on Earth and Life Studies presents “Floods in Asia: 2nd Annual Ramanathan Climate Conversation,” on Oct 31, 2023, from 10:00 AM to 11:15 AM ET, as a part of the Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action and Climate Crossroads projects. During the event, participants Carolyn Beeler, Aditi Mukherji, and Nguyen Huu Thien discuss how to reduce the impact of climate-worsened floods in Asia.

About Floods in Asia: 2nd Annual Ramanathan Climate Conversation

“As seas rise and rain becomes more intense, flooding is becoming an even more serious challenge around the world, including in Asia, where Pakistan, India, China, Indonesia, and other countries have all experienced intense floods in recent years. Drawing on case studies from different regions of Asia, this year’s Ramanathan Climate Conversation will explore the impacts of climate change on flooding from rain, rivers, and seas, and will discuss approaches that can mitigate the damage — such as coastal and floodplain restoration, construction of spillways, and modifications to the built environment. Carolyn Beeler (The World) will moderate the conversation with Aditi Mukherji (CGIAR) and Nguyen Huu Thien (freelance ecologist).”

Participant Bios

Carolyn Beeler is an Environment Correspondent and Editor for The World, a daily international radio news show heard by more than 3 million listeners across the U.S. each week. She reports and edits stories focused on the people and places most impacted by climate change, and what they’re doing to address it. She has reported from all seven continents and won national and regional awards for her breaking news and in-depth feature reporting.

Aditi Mukherji is the Director of the Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Impact Area Platform at the CGIAR. Aditi has been an author on the latest round of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessments (AR6), including as a core writing team member of the IPCC Synthesis Report published in March 2023.  Aditi was previously a Principal Researcher at the International Water Management Institute (2019-2023) and Theme Leader (Water and Air) at the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development in Nepal (2013-2018).

Nguyen Huu Thien is a freelance consultant with over 30 years of experience working on issues of climate change, natural resources management, wetland biodiversity conservation, and sustainable livelihoods in Southeast Asia. Thien currently specializes in the Mekong Delta area of Vietnam, where he works with local community leaders to address local climate challenges as well as bridges the gap between policymakers and researchers to promote science-based policymaking at regional and national levels.

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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Impacts of climate change on flooding from rain, rivers, and seas

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Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine presents the report Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. As of today, flooding poses the most significant economic risk and social impact in the United States, of all climate extremes and natural hazards. As a result of our climate crisis, the severity, intensity, and extent of flooding is increasing over time. Further, the book highlights how “…catastrophic flooding from recent hurricanes, including Superstorm Sandy in New York (2012) and Hurricane Harvey in Houston (2017), caused billions of dollars in property damage, adversely affected millions of people, and damaged the economic well-being of major metropolitan areas.” Between 2004 and 2014, major freshwater flood events cost an average of 70 lives and $9 billion USD annually in direct damage — excluding the cumulative impacts of frequent, small floods, which can be similar to infrequent, extreme floods. Examining real-world examples in metropolitan areas, such as New York and Houston, Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States identifies similarities and differences in the root causes, adverse impacts, mitigation strategies, and unforeseen issues.

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Policy and Global AffairsDivision on Earth and Life Studies; Program on Risk, Resilience, and Extreme Events; Water Science and Technology BoardCommittee on Urban Flooding in the United States

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/25381.)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All Rights Reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp.

ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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National Academies on Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding

National Academies on Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding

 

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine presents the report Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. As of today, flooding poses the most significant economic risk and social impact in the United States, of all climate extremes and natural hazards. As a result of our climate crisis, the severity, intensity, and extent of flooding is increasing over time. Further, the book highlights how “…catastrophic flooding from recent hurricanes, including Superstorm Sandy in New York (2012) and Hurricane Harvey in Houston (2017), caused billions of dollars in property damage, adversely affected millions of people, and damaged the economic well-being of major metropolitan areas.” Between 2004 and 2014, major freshwater flood events cost an average of 70 lives and $9 billion USD annually in direct damage — excluding the cumulative impacts of frequent, small floods, which can be similar to infrequent, extreme floods. Examining real-world examples in metropolitan areas, such as New York and Houston, Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States identifies similarities and differences in the root causes, adverse impacts, mitigation strategies, and unforeseen issues.

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Policy and Global AffairsDivision on Earth and Life Studies; Program on Risk, Resilience, and Extreme Events; Water Science and Technology BoardCommittee on Urban Flooding in the United States

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/25381.)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All Rights Reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp.

ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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