Transportation Resilience 2023 on Extreme Weather and Climate Change Challenges

Convened by the Transportation Research Board or TRB, the Transportation Resilience 2023 conference features panel discussions, expert presentations, and poster sessions. The conference is in person at the National Academy of Sciences Building in Washington, D.C., with hybrid sessions. Further, Transportation Resilience 2023 “provides attendees with information on emerging best practices and state-of-the-art research results on how to adapt transportation networks to the potential impacts of climate change and extreme weather events. The focus includes vulnerability and resilience to climate change and extreme weather events impacting all modes of transportation, including pedestrian, automobile, rail, transit, aviation, and pipeline facilities and critical infrastructure.”

The event addresses resilience integration across the transportation sector, including but not limited to, design, engineering, planning, operations and maintenance (O&M), asset management, and emergency management and communications. The target audience includes transportation practitioners, researchers, educators, consultants, government agencies, businesses, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders from around the world. Organizers welcome and encourage participation from local, tribal, state, national, and international perspectives.

Transportation Resilience 2023 Conference Objectives

  • Develop common understandings of transportation resilience concepts and state of practice
  • Share approaches for integrating climate resilience into agency processes, design standards, and standards of practice
  • Learn new methods for prioritizing and evaluating performance of resilience investments
  • Discuss transportation resilience funding and financing challenges and opportunities
  • Discover successful approaches for meaningful community engagement around transportation resilience
  • Develop an international peer learning network to exchange ideas

National Academy of Sciences Building, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., USA

Convened by: Transportation Research Board

Supported by: U.S. Department of Transportation, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials

Sponsored by: Standing Committee on Natural Hazards and Extreme Weather Events (AMR50)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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International Conference on Extreme Weather and Climate Change Challenges

International Conference on Extreme Weather and Climate Change Challenges

 

Convened by the Transportation Research Board or TRB, the Transportation Resilience 2023 conference features panel discussions, expert presentations, and poster sessions. The conference is in person at the National Academy of Sciences Building in Washington, D.C., with hybrid sessions. Further, Transportation Resilience 2023 “provides attendees with information on emerging best practices and state-of-the-art research results on how to adapt transportation networks to the potential impacts of climate change and extreme weather events. The focus includes vulnerability and resilience to climate change and extreme weather events impacting all modes of transportation, including pedestrian, automobile, rail, transit, aviation, and pipeline facilities and critical infrastructure.”

The event addresses resilience integration across the transportation sector, including but not limited to, design, engineering, planning, operations and maintenance (O&M), asset management, and emergency management and communications. The target audience includes transportation practitioners, researchers, educators, consultants, government agencies, businesses, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders from around the world. Organizers welcome and encourage participation from local, tribal, state, national, and international perspectives.

Transportation Resilience 2023 Conference Objectives

  • Develop common understandings of transportation resilience concepts and state of practice
  • Share approaches for integrating climate resilience into agency processes, design standards, and standards of practice
  • Learn new methods for prioritizing and evaluating performance of resilience investments
  • Discuss transportation resilience funding and financing challenges and opportunities
  • Discover successful approaches for meaningful community engagement around transportation resilience
  • Develop an international peer learning network to exchange ideas

National Academy of Sciences Building, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., USA

Convened by: Transportation Research Board

Supported by: U.S. Department of Transportation, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials

Sponsored by: Standing Committee on Natural Hazards and Extreme Weather Events (AMR50)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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The Science of Extreme Weather Attribution in the Context of Climate Change

“As the climate has warmed over recent years, a new pattern of more frequent and more intense weather events has unfolded across the globe. Climate models simulate such changes in extreme events, and some of the reasons for the changes are well understood. Warming increases the likelihood of extremely hot days and nights, favors increased atmospheric moisture that may result in more frequent heavy rainfall and snowfall and leads to evaporation that can exacerbate droughts.

Even with evidence of these broad trends, scientists cautioned in the past that individual weather events couldn’t be attributed to climate change. Now, with advances in understanding the climate science behind extreme events and the science of extreme event attribution, such blanket statements may not be accurate. The relatively young science of extreme event attribution seeks to tease out the influence of human-caused climate change from other factors, such as natural sources of variability like El Niño, as contributors to individual extreme events.

Event attribution can answer questions about how much climate change influenced the probability or intensity of a specific type of weather event. As event attribution capabilities improve, they could help inform choices about assessing and managing risk, and in guiding climate adaptation strategies. This report examines the current state of the science of extreme weather attribution and identifies ways to move the science forward to improve attribution capabilities.”

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Division on Earth and Life StudiesBoard on Atmospheric Sciences and ClimateCommittee on Extreme Weather Events and Climate Change Attribution

This study was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation under contract number 2015-63077, the Heising-Simons Foundation under contract number 2015-095, the Litterman Family Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under contract number NNX15AW55G, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration under contract number EE-133E-15-SE-1748, and the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-SC0014256, with additional support from the National Academy of Sciences’ Arthur L. Day Fund. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-38094-2
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-38094-4
Library of Congress Control Number: 2016946880
Digital Object Identifier: 10.17226/21852

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21852.)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All Rights Reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp.

ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change

Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change

 

“As the climate has warmed over recent years, a new pattern of more frequent and more intense weather events has unfolded across the globe. Climate models simulate such changes in extreme events, and some of the reasons for the changes are well understood. Warming increases the likelihood of extremely hot days and nights, favors increased atmospheric moisture that may result in more frequent heavy rainfall and snowfall and leads to evaporation that can exacerbate droughts.

Even with evidence of these broad trends, scientists cautioned in the past that individual weather events couldn’t be attributed to climate change. Now, with advances in understanding the climate science behind extreme events and the science of extreme event attribution, such blanket statements may not be accurate. The relatively young science of extreme event attribution seeks to tease out the influence of human-caused climate change from other factors, such as natural sources of variability like El Niño, as contributors to individual extreme events.

Event attribution can answer questions about how much climate change influenced the probability or intensity of a specific type of weather event. As event attribution capabilities improve, they could help inform choices about assessing and managing risk, and in guiding climate adaptation strategies. This report examines the current state of the science of extreme weather attribution and identifies ways to move the science forward to improve attribution capabilities.”

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Division on Earth and Life StudiesBoard on Atmospheric Sciences and ClimateCommittee on Extreme Weather Events and Climate Change Attribution

This study was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation under contract number 2015-63077, the Heising-Simons Foundation under contract number 2015-095, the Litterman Family Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under contract number NNX15AW55G, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration under contract number EE-133E-15-SE-1748, and the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-SC0014256, with additional support from the National Academy of Sciences’ Arthur L. Day Fund. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-38094-2
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-38094-4
Library of Congress Control Number: 2016946880
Digital Object Identifier: 10.17226/21852

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21852.)

© 2023 National Academy of Sciences. All Rights Reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp.

ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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ASCE Industry Leaders Council Urges Updates to Standards Due to Climate Crisis

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Issues & Advocacy group and the ASCE Industry Leaders Council (ILC) strongly urges interim updates to ASCE Standards, in order to keep pace with climate change and extreme weather. In response to our climate crisis, to date the ASCE issued numerous formal Position Statements (PS) such as PS 360 – Climate Change, PS 488 – Greenhouse Gases, and PS 500 – Resilient Infrastructure Initiatives. The position statements outline general opinions of the ASCE, but regrettably do not directly describe the immediate demand for the ASCE to address climate change and extreme weather in standard documents. On balance, a select set of cities and agencies across the U.S. already developed numerous custom standards to account for our climate crisis, including sea level rise (SLR) and extreme rainfall.

ClimaTwin™ empowers infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle.

© 2022 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin™, ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, and the ClimaTwin logo are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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