Impacts of Climate Change and Increasing Temperatures on the Built Environment

Impacts of Climate Change and Increasing Temperatures on the Built Environment

Buildings need to be designed and constructed in order to withstand extreme heat.

The increasing temperatures due to climate change are causing a significant impact on the built environment. As temperatures continue to rise, buildings need to be designed and constructed in order to withstand extreme heat and changes in weather patterns. However, with innovative design and sustainable building practices, the built environment can adapt and thrive in the face of climate change.

One positive aspect of increasing temperatures is the opportunity for green building practices to proliferate. Buildings can be designed with cooling techniques such as natural ventilation and passive cooling systems. Further, the use of sustainable materials and green roofs can help reduce the urban heat island effect, lowering energy consumption and improving the overall comfort of the built environment.

As communities face the challenges of increasing temperatures, the opportunity exists to create more resilient and adaptable infrastructure. By incorporating climate-resilient design principles, buildings can better withstand extreme weather events and rising sea levels, ensuring the safety and longevity of the built environment for future generations.

In conclusion, while increasing temperatures due to climate change present challenges for the built environment, opportunities also exist for positive change. Through sustainable building practices and resilient design, the built environment can adapt and thrive in the face of climate change.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2023 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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List of terms

Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events Report by the National Academies

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Resilient America Program released a consensus study report on Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events. Issued by the Committee on Hazard Mitigation and Resilience Applied Research Topics, the report identifies and summarizes key research topics for the applied research community based on numerous workshop discussions with the Resilient America Roundtable and hazard subject-matter-experts.

About the Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events Report: “A cascading hazard refers to a primary event, such as heavy rainfall, seismic activity, or rapid snowmelt, followed by a chain of consequences that may range from modest (lesser than the original event) to substantial. Also, the type of cascading damage and losses may be more severe than if they had occurred separately. Currently, research on disasters has focused largely on those triggered by natural hazards interacting with vulnerable human systems (e.g., populations and organizations) and the built environment.”

“Compounding and cascading natural hazards, whether acute or chronic in nature, can be further amplified by other events, such as public health outbreaks, supply chain disruptions, and cyberattacks. Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events explores strategies that would enable the nation to be better prepared for and respond to these disasters so that affected communities can not only rebuild but do so in a manner that increases their resilience to future events.”

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Policy and Global Affairs; Committee on Hazard Mitigation and Resilience Applied Research Topics; Steve Moddemeyer, Negin Sobhani, and Berna Oztekin-Gunaydin, Editors.

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/26659.)

© 2022 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2022 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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National Academies Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events Report

National Academies Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events Report

 

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Resilient America Program released a consensus study report on Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events. Issued by the Committee on Hazard Mitigation and Resilience Applied Research Topics, the report identifies and summarizes key research topics for the applied research community based on numerous workshop discussions with the Resilient America Roundtable and hazard subject-matter-experts.

About the Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events Report: “A cascading hazard refers to a primary event, such as heavy rainfall, seismic activity, or rapid snowmelt, followed by a chain of consequences that may range from modest (lesser than the original event) to substantial. Also, the type of cascading damage and losses may be more severe than if they had occurred separately. Currently, research on disasters has focused largely on those triggered by natural hazards interacting with vulnerable human systems (e.g., populations and organizations) and the built environment.”

“Compounding and cascading natural hazards, whether acute or chronic in nature, can be further amplified by other events, such as public health outbreaks, supply chain disruptions, and cyberattacks. Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events explores strategies that would enable the nation to be better prepared for and respond to these disasters so that affected communities can not only rebuild but do so in a manner that increases their resilience to future events.”

Contributor(s): National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Policy and Global Affairs; Committee on Hazard Mitigation and Resilience Applied Research Topics; Steve Moddemeyer, Negin Sobhani, and Berna Oztekin-Gunaydin, Editors.

(Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Resilience for Compounding and Cascading Events. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/26659.)

© 2022 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

About ClimaTwin®

ClimaTwin® is a leading climate risk intelligence solution for infrastructure assets and the built environment.

We empower infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle. By connecting complex climate models and infrastructure digital twins, our solution enables engineers, owner-operators, and governments to aggregate, visualize, and analyze disparate datasets, revealing site-specific insights at a hyper-local scale. Benefits include 5-10x near-term returns and lifetime cost-avoidance by mitigating risks to systems, services, and societies.

To learn more about climate risk intelligence for your infrastructure assets, please visit www.climatwin.com today.

© 2022 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin® is a registered trademark of ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, the ClimaTwin logo, and Climate Risk Intelligence for Infrastructure Digital Twins™ are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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Climate Conversations on Severe Wildfire, Human Health and The Built Environment

Climate Conversations on Severe Wildfire, Human Health and The Built Environment

On August 25, 2022, the National Academy of Sciences hosts “Climate Conversations: Wildfire,” to discuss how to protect human health and the built environment in the face of more frequent and severe wildfires in the U.S.

Climate change is increasing the frequency, severity, and extent of areas burned by wildfires across the U.S., endangering the health, safety, and welfare of our communities to fire, smoke, and debris, which can travel thousands of miles.

During the online event, A.R. “Ravi” Ravishankara (Colorado State University) moderates a conversation between Sarah Coefield (Missoula City-County Health Department) and Erica Fischer (Oregon State University).

The subject matter experts discuss how city planners and decision makers confront the challenges of more frequent and severe wildfires, and protect the built environment and human health today and in the future.

@theNASEM hosts A.R. “Ravi” Ravishankara (@CSUAtmosSci), Sarah Coefield (@MissoulaCounty), and @Erica_Fischer (@EngineeringOSU) for #ClimateConversations: Wildfire

(Image Source: National Academy of Sciences)

© 2022 National Academy of Sciences. All Rights Reserved

ClimaTwin™ empowers infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle.

© 2022 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin™, ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, and the ClimaTwin logo are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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The Digital Twin Consortium Launches Open-Source Repository

The Digital Twin Consortium Launches Open-Source Repository

The Digital Twin Consortium’s open-source initiative is now available to the general public on GitHub, distributed version control and source code management. Objectives of the open-source initiative include “encouraging innovation, accelerating usage, and expanding collaboration” with digital twins. Further, the Digital Twin Consortium’s open-source community is speeding up the adoption of digital twin technologies and techniques across numerous industries and practices, such as the engineering, operations, and maintenance of infrastructure assets in the built environment. The open-source repository features open-source code, open-source models, collaborative documents, technical assets, and other assets.

ClimaTwin™ empowers infrastructure stakeholders to mitigate climate risks and assess adaptation actions across the total asset lifecycle.

© 2021 ClimaTwin Corp. ClimaTwin™, ClimaTwin Basic™, ClimaTwin Enterprise™, and the ClimaTwin logo are trademarks of ClimaTwin Corp. All rights reserved.

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